WEYMOUTH BL11 / M64

Official No:  117704  Port Number and Year:   3rd in Bristol,  1903  (BL11)

                                                                                8th in Milford, 1919.

                                                                                               -   in Grimsby, 1926 (GY386)

Description: Steel side / beam trawler; steam screw, coal burning.  Ketch rigged: foresail, mainsail and mizzen.

Crew:  9 men (1903, 1926)

Registered at Milford: 12 Aug 1919

Built: 1903 by Smith's Dock Co., North Shields.  (Yard no. 709)

Tonnage: 178.46 grt  30 net.   (1914: 67.99 net.)

Length / breadth / depth (feet): 110.0 / 21.0 / 11.4

Engine: T-3Cyl.  51 nhp  9 kts.  Engine and boiler by McColl & Pollock, Sunderland.

Owners:

 

As BL11

20 May 1903: Western Steam Trawling Co. Ltd., Docks, Shannon Court, Bristol.

Manager: Messrs. Sellick, Morley and Price, Steamship Office, Milford.

 

As M64

12 Aug 1919:  Charles Ingram Hole, Charles St., Milford.  (Grocer)             21/64

                        Frederick Llewellyn, Charles St., Milford.  (Ironmonger)  )   21/64

                        Harry Llewellyn, Charles St., Milford.                               )

Managing owner: Oliver Curphy, 19 St.Ann's Rd., Hakin.  (Fish buyer).       22/64

 

24 Nov 1919:  The North Lincoln Steam Fishing Co. Ltd., Fish Docks, Grimsby

Manager: Thomas Sowerby. (Same address.)

 

Mar 1926: F.D. & W.G. Jeffs, Grimsby.

Managing owner: W.G. Jeffs.

 

As GY386

11 Mar 1926: Walter Garrat, Fish Docks, Grimsby, Lincs.

Managing owner.

 

1930: Fred B. Jeffs, Fish Docks, Grimsby.

Managing owner.

 

Aug 1931: Thomas W. Baskcomb, Nunsfield, Bargate,  Grimsby.

Managing owner.

 

22 Oct 1935: Fred Parkes, 238 Dock St., Fleetwood.

Manager: Basil A. Parkes, 'Clydesdale', Whiteside Way, Cleveleys.

 

[ Information from  the Fleetwood Maritime Heritage Trust and "The Bosun's Watch". ]

Landed at Milford: As BL11: 31 May 1903 - 14 Feb 1915; 13 Apr - 10 Aug 1919.  

As M64: 13 Aug 1919 - 27 Nov 1922.

Skippers:

Robert Samuel Longthorpe cert. 2536, age 35, born Hull.

Frederick Robert Balar 8448;  George A. Smith 4601;  John Gittens 3983 (7 Dec 1922);

William Brown 2897; N. Julier 5841 (11 Aug 1924);  Charles Board 12252 (27 Sep 1924)                    

J. Dabb 3198 (10 Nov 1924); Robert Smith 8171 (9 Dec 1924); H. Lancaster  3377 (2 Mar 1925)

D. Vincent 11420 (29 Sep 1925); John Yolland (1910); W. Holder (1914).

Notes: 

Feb 1915:  Requisitioned and converted to minesweeper; Admy.no. 939. 1 x 6 pdr.

2 Apr 1915 - 20 Oct 1917: Based as minesweeper at Milford.

Jun 1915: Picked up the crew of torpedoed steamship DUMFRIESHIRE off the Smalls.

1919: Returned to owners.

31 Mar 1936: Grimsby registry closed.  Broken up.

Cert. Cancelled & Milford Registry Closed: 8 Mar 1926.  Vessel transferred to the port of Grimsby.

Accidents and Incidents

The Times, Tuesday, Dec 15, 1903; pg. 6; Issue 37264; col F
     Shipping Disaster.

 

The Milford Haven steam trawler Weymouth Castle [ sic ] put into Milford yesterday morning and reported the loss of five of her crew and one of the crew of the Manorbier Castle, another Milford trawler.  The disaster occurred in Corunna Bay on Thursday evening.  The weather being too rough for fishing, five men from the Weymouth Castle and five from the Manorbier Castle went ashore in one boat.  Two hours later, when the boat was expected to return, cries were heard.  A boat put off from the Weymouth Castle, manned by Skipper Longthorpe and some others.  They found that the boat with the ten men had met with a heavy surf.  Seven were washed out of her, and one of these, the boatswain of the Manorbier Castle, swam ashore, and was taken off the rocks next morning.  The skipper, second engineer and a deckhand of the Manorbier Castle managed to keep in the boat, and were rescued.  The following is a list of the drowned: Alfred Brown, deckhand, Milford, married; William Seymour, boatswain, Brixham; Samuel Knight, third hand, Milford, married; William Holman, second engineer, Milford, married; and William Varley, trimmer, Milford, single, all of the Weymouth Castle; and Jack Garnett of Hull, formerly of Milford, third hand, of the Manorbier Castle.

 

[ Note: Skipper Longthorpe was skipper of the WEYMOUTH; there was no trawler named WEYMOUTH CASTLE. ]

 

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From Cardiff Times of Saturday, 19th December 1903:

Boat Capsized

SIX LIVES LOST. - FOUR SAVED.

Milford Trawler's Disaster.

            The steam trawler Weymouth (Messrs Sellick, Morley, and Price) arrived in Milford Haven on Monday morning with news of a terrible boating fatality off Barquero, Portugal, last Thursday night, resulting in the loss of five hands from the Weymouth and one from the trawler Manorbier Castle.

            Interviewed by our representative the skipper (S. R. Longthorpe) said: My vessel and the Manorbier were anchored in Barquero Bay, on the coast of Portugal, in the Bay of Biscay, on Thursday last. I sent five men with five men from the Manorbier ashore in a boat from the latter ship for stores. About 11 o'clock at night I heard cries for help coming from the water towards the shore. I launched a boat and proceeded in the direction of the sound, and discovered that the Manorbier Castle's boat had capsized, and only three of the ten men were clinging to her. We rescued these, but all the others had disappeared. Next morning we found one man had managed to get ashore. All the four survivors belonged to the Manorbier Castle.

            Our representative ascertained from further inquiries that a heavy gale prevailed at the time and that the men were probably swept out of the boat by a heavy sea. Both vessels left for Milford Haven, but whereas the Weymouth arrived early on Monday morning the Manorbier had not come in up to 4 p.m., and the survivors are on board her. The terrible occurrence has caused quite a sensation at Milford, coming so soon after a similar catastrophe which happened in Dale Roads, when three men were drowned.

            The Manorbier's hand who is drowned was J. Galnett, third hand, of Hull, unmarried.

            The five drowned men of the Weymouth are W. Holman, second engineer, of Bristol, married. W. Seymour, boatswain, Plymouth, married. S. Knight, fourth hand, Yarmouth, married. A. Brown, fifth hand, Hull, married. J. Varley, trimmer, North Shields, single.

            It is reported that five of the men's bodies have been washed ashore near the scene of the fatality.

 

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From The Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser of Friday 1st January 1904:

 

MILFORD HAVEN

................

        On Wednesday the 'Weymouth' (Skipper Longthorpe) put into port with one of the heaviest cargoes ever landed at Milford. She had been fishing in Portuguese waters, and the catch comprised 80 kits of hake, 120 boxes of bream, and about 80 boxes of other kinds. The fish realised 300. This is the record for quantity of fish caught, but not the record price, which is over 500, some years ago, when higher prices were realised. There is a great scarcity of labour in the Milford fish market. Something like 100 men can he found regular employment as labourers, the wages being 6d per hour, and the hours of labour being nine hours daily in winter and ten hours in summer.

 

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From the Haverfordwest & Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 3rd August 1904:

 

    Two fine trips have to be recorded this week.  On Monday, the "Centaur", owned by Mr. D. Pettit, realised 360 with her catch, and on Tuesday one of Messrs. Sellick, Morley and Price's vessels, the "Weymouth", made 390.  A large quantity of soles were included in the hauls.

 

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From the Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 8th June, 1905:

 

    At Bantry Bay Petty Sessions, Charles Reed, Skipper of the steam trawler "Comus", belonging to Messrs. Sellick, Morley and Price, Milford, was fined 75, and 2-9-0 costs, for illegal trawling in Bantry Bay.  A fine of 50 and costs was also imposed on Skipper George Medway, of the steam trawler "Weymouth", owned by the same firm.

    It was stated for the owners that they were anxious to discourage poaching, and that the defendants had erred through lack of local knowledge.

.....

    The Bench ordered all the nests to be forfeited.  Mr. Purdon, Residing Magistrate, said these trawlers had been making Bantry Bay their happy hunting grounds, and the magistrates were determined in future to inflict very heavy penalties for illegal steam trawlers.

 

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From the Haverfordwest & Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 8th November 1905:

 

At Bantry Bay Petty Sessions, a fine of 50 and costs were imposed for illegal fishing in Bantry Bay on the the skipper George Medway, of the steam trawler Weymouth.  It was stated for the owners that they were anxious to discourage poaching, and the skipper erred through lack of local knowledge.

 

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From The Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser of Friday 14th June 1907:

Trawler Tragedies.

INQUEST REVELATIONS AT MILFORD HAVEN.

    The steam trawler "Weymouth", on arrival in dock at Milford, reported that when fishing on the north-west coast of Ireland the second engineer found that the chief engineer, Frank Klimt, an Austrian, aged 30, had fallen among the engines. When taken out he was found in a mangled state. Klimt was a single man, and had sailed out of Milford for about four years.

   

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From the West Wales Guardian of Friday 19th March 1909:

 

Nine Days In an Open Boat

SUFFERINGS OF DISABLED TRAWLER'S CREW

                                                                                        Queenstown, Monday

    News has just reached here from Ballyheigue, Co. Kerry, to the effect that the master, Captain Godfrey, and the deck hand of the steam trawler Monarch, of Cardiff, were picked up  north of Kerry Head at midnight last night, after nine days in an open boat.

    The disabled steam trawler Monarch, on which seven men had been drifting since the 17th inst., was picked up off the Blasket Islands, West Coast of Ireland, late on Monday night, by the Milford trawler Weymouth, and is being towed to port.

    Captain Kilby, of the steam trawler Ardent, of Milford, interviewed on Tuesday, stated that he was alongside the Cardiff trawler Monarch for a couple of hours on Sunday.  The Milford trawler Weymouth was towing the Monarch under difficulties.  The hawser parted once.  While the Ardent was alongside the Monarch's engineer told Captain Kilby that the fore engine was blown right out through the bursting of the condenser, badly injuring the second engineer, the mate, the third hand and the cook.  The Ardent offered assistance, but Captain Woodgate, of the Weymouth, said he was making for the nearest port.  They were then about eighty miles south-east by east of Bull Rock Light, and Captain judged from the course steered and by the fog and wind prevailing, that the Weymouth was bound to make for Milford.  She had not arrived by Tuesday night's tide.

    The Monarch was owned by Messrs Neale and West, and several of the crew have their homes in Milford.

 

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From the West Wales Guardian of Friday 31st December 1909:

 

    Nine Days in an Open Boat

SUFFERINGS OF DISABLED TRAWLER'S CREW

                                                                                                                Queenstown, Monday

    News has just reached here from Ballyheigue, Co. Kerry, to the effect that the master, Captain Godfrey, and the deck hand of the steam trawler Monarch, of Cardiff, were picked up north of Kerry Head at midnight last night, after nine days in an open boat.

_______________

 

    The disabled Cardiff steam trawler Monarch, on which seven men had been drifting since 17th inst., was picked up off the Blaskets Islands, West Coast of Ireland, late on Monday night by the Milford trawler Weymouth, and is being towed to port.

________________

 

    Captain Kilby, of the steam trawler Ardent of Milford, interviewed on Tuesday, stated that he was alongside the Cardiff trawler Monarch for a couple of hours on Sunday.  The Milford trawler Weymouth was towing the Monarch under difficulties. The hawser parted once.  While the Ardent was alongside, the Monarch's engineer told Captain Kilby that the fore engine was blown right out through the bursting of the condenser, badly injuring the second engineer, the mate, the third hand, and the cook.  The Ardent offered assistance, but Captain Woodgate, of the Weymouth, said he was making for the nearest port.  They were then about 80 miles south-east by east of Bull Rock Light, and Captain Kilby judged from the course steered and by the fog and wind prevailing, that the Weymouth was bound to make for Milford.  She had not arrived by Tuesday night's tide.

    The Monarch was owned by Messrs Neale & West, and several of the crews have their homes at Milford.

 

Note: According to the "Irish Times" of 30th December 1909, the MONARCH's crew abandoned ship on 23rd December following an explosion in the engine room on 17th December.  WEYMOUTH picked up the crew on 26th December, and crew were landed at Milford on the 29th.

 

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From The Pembrokeshire Herald and General Advertiser of Friday 13th May 1910:

JOTTINGS.    

......................

    The steam trawler "Weymouth" returned to port on Wednesday morning with Mr. H. Galvin, the skipper, injured. The winch had been damaged at sea, and Mr. Galvin was assisting in the repairs, when a heavy iron bar fell, and struck him on the foot. The injury received caused such pain that he was unable to put his foot on the ground, and consequently was rendered hors de combat.

    The steam liner "Earnest" returned to port on the same date, with the cook, William Hiley, ill. He was taken to his home, where he received medical attention.

 

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From the Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 5th October 1910 (page 3. column 4), supplied by Mr Terence Peters:

 

Skipper's Death at Sea

The Inquest

Early on Monday morning the steam trawler "Weymouth" (Messrs Sellick, Morley & Price) arrived in Milford Docks, having on board the dead body of the skipper, Wm. Peters, a well-known Milford resident. The sad story of how he died was told at an inquest held by the coroner, Mr H J E Price, at the Sessions House yesterday afternoon.

George Johnston, 8 Mansfield Street, Milford Haven, was first called and said that the deceased was his brother-in-law. He was 40 years of age on the day he died and was engaged as skipper on the "Weymouth". Witness last saw him alive at one o'clock on Wednesday, when he left for sea. He seemed quite well then, and witness had never known a doctor to attend him.

Horace Setterfield, 8 Mansfield Street, a mate on the "Weymouth", said the vessel left Milford last Wednesday about 2 o'clock, proceeding to the fishing grounds. On Sunday, they were 86 miles west of St Anne's Head. In the morning deceased appeared as usual and had had dinner at one o'clock, but had no tea. The trawl was drawn and they commenced to haul it up at 6.20 p.m. Peters was driving a steam winch. Witness noticed that he had slipped on to the deck and was in a half upright position. He would have fallen full length but a part of the winch kept him up. Deceased was talking to witness about three minutes before, but did not complain. Witness shouted for help and tried artificial respiration. but without success. They then put in for Milford.

Dr Walker said he made a post-mortem examination of the body which showed no marks of violence. The heart was enormously distended and there was a large hemorrhage [sic], and fatty degeneration. In witness's opinion, death was caused by rupture of the heart, following fatty degeneration.

The Coroner: That would cause sudden death.

Witness: Yes, instantaneous.

"Death from natural causes" was the verdict. Much sympathy is felt with the widow, who is left with ten children.

 

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From the Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 16th December 1910:

 

STIRRING SCENES AT MILFORD HAVEN

.................

FURTHER OMINOUS NEWS

................

    The steam trawler "Weymouth" came up flag half-mast and there was more speculation as to what had happened.  The mate, Frank Whittimore, had been washed overboard and drowned.  He was a steady young fellow who had been out of a boat for a long time and this was his first trip in the "Weymouth".  He leaves a young widow and two children.  He was a prominent player in a billiard tournament at the Bethel, and was a general favourite with his confreres.  The trawlers arriving by every tide report damage, boats and wheel-houses being smashed.

 

From the Haverfordwest and Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 21st December 1910:

 

    A subscription list has been opened on behalf of the widow and children of the late Frank Whittimore, who was lost at sea off the steam trawler "Weymouth" on December 16th, this being a most deserving case.  The Commander of the Port of Hull Fishermen's Protective Society makes this urgent appeal to all those who can help.  Donations, however small, will be most thankfully received by the following:  Mr. Rust, Victoria Road; Fisherman's Shop, the Docks; R.N.M. to D.S.F., Charles Street.

 

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From the Haverfordwest & Milford Haven Telegraph of Wednesday 18th June 1919:

 

    Some excitement was manifested on the Milford Docks during last week when it became known that Messrs. Sellick, Morley and Price were disposing of their fleet of steam trawlers.  For a considerable time negotiations had been proceeding with the Consolidation Company of Grimsby, but these recently fell through.  It is gratifying to know that the greater portion of the fleet has been retained for the port, as will be seen from the following list.  Several local gentlemen having come forward, the competition was very keen.

    The Alnmouth, Weigelia, and Exmouth have been sold to Fleetwood firms, while the Charmouth, Macaw, Tacsonia, Rosa, Xylopia, Essex, Uhdea, Petunia, Lynmouth, Kalmia, Portsmouth, Weymouth, Syringa, Yarmouth and Magnolia have all found local buyers.

    This opens out the question of the need for local trades people and others to invest in the staple industry of this fishing port, as has been done in competing fishing centres.

 

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From the West Wales Guardian of Friday 23rd January 1920:

 

    The Cuxwold Steam Fishing Company of Grimsby are erecting new offices and store sheds at the Docks, Milford Haven, and we understand, are to adopt them permanently for their headquarters.  This company recently purchased two local trawlers, the Portsmouth and the Weymouth.  One of the company's Grimsby vessels has now arrived and is to be followed by others.

 

   

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